The Color of Our Skin

Racial Inequities Exist

smylie

“When I came to St. Patrick Center, hopeless and
full of despair, it was never about my skin color
or gender or anything like that. It was about
compassion, empathy and love – what I needed
in order to become who God created me to be.”
– James Smylie, St. Patrick Center Board of Directors

Since our beginnings in 1983, St. Patrick Center has fought for marginalized individuals. “Unfortunately, African Americans and communities of color have been disproportionately marginalized, leading to inequity and mistreatment,” said CEO Anthony D’Agostino.

The St. Patrick Center team is upset about racial inequities and angered by the brutality and killings of our black neighbors, as the pandemic ravages communities of color as well. “We need to acknowledge that racial inequities exist,” said Rhea Irvin, Director of Human Resources. “The color of our skin should never determine how we are treated,” said James Smylie, board member and former client. “When I came to St. Patrick Center, hopeless and full of despair, it was never about my skin color or gender or anything like that. It was about compassion, empathy and love – what I needed in order to become who God created me to be.”

As St. Patrick Center carries out our mission, we see the racial inequities that exist in our society. “We need listen to people of color to learn how they experience racism,” added Irvin. “We can do better if we open our minds and are willing to have uncomfortable conversations.” “We ask you to join us in  cultivating a community where everyone receives equitable resources, opportunities and influence,”
D’Agostino said. “We will continue to educate ourselves and others about racial inequities and ensure that everyone gets a voice and the opportunity to succeed.”

As seen in the August 2020 Chronicles

Published August 4, 2020